Posted: November 2, 2016

Using Instructional Design Theory to Develop a Clinical Reasoning Curriculum

Description

Clinical reasoning is a core skill for early physicians in training, yet few curricula grounded in instructional design theory describe how to teach this complex task. Four-component instructional design (4CID) is a whole task approach to curriculum development that has recently been applied to other areas of medical education that may provide a natural framework for teaching clinical reasoning. By adjusting the content and complexity of the learning tasks, and the degree of scaffolding offered by the supportive and JIT information, the curriculum can accommodate different learner levels, and fit within a multitude of curricular structures. The blueprint can help track students' clinical reasoning longitudinally, and may be linked to entrustment decisions.

*Presented at Learn Serve Lead 2016

Keywords

Clinical Reasoning, Curriculum Design, LSL 2016, 4C/ID

Authors

Michael Cole, MD, University of Michigan Medical School

Michelle Daniel, MD, University of Michigan Medical School

Nikhil Theyyunni, MD, University of Michigan Medical School

Robert Huang, MD, University of Michigan Medical School

Sandro Cinti, MD, University of Michigan Medical School

Steven Rougas, MD, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


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