Posted: November 4, 2016

Hand-Wringing Still Isn't Working: Let's Get Effective in Improving Diversity of Medical School Graduates

Description

The call to increase diversity in medical school graduates and thus the physician workforce is decades old, however Black/African Americans and Latinos remain underrepresented in medicine. In 2010, the population of the United States was 13% Black /African American and 17% Latino. In 2015-2016, matriculants into medical school were 6.9% Black/African American and 9% Latino, underrepresenting their proportion of the population by half. We must increase the number of underrepresented minorities in medicine who enter practice to address the health care needs of our diverse population. Though statistics about URM in premedical curricula are difficult to find, STEM fields see a 69% URM attrition in undergraduate years. Since 2000, Sophie Davis has admitted an average of 47% underrepresented minorities (URM) into the BS-MD program. Sophie Davis is a school strongly driven by its mission, and we measure our success by mission-defined outcomes. Over the last 40 years, 94% of our African-American students and 93% of our Latino students received MD degrees. Over 60% of these graduates reported working in health profession shortage areas (HPSAs)

*Presented at Learn Serve Lead 2016

Keywords

Diversity, Admissions, Inclusion, Retention, LSL 2016

Authors

Ana Motta-Moss, PhD, City University of New York School of Medicine, Sophie Davis Biomedical Program

Lisa Auerbach, MD, City University of New York School of Medicine, Sophie Davis Biomedical Program

Nicole Roberts, PhD, City University of New York School of Medicine, Sophie Davis Biomedical Program


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