Posted: September 24, 2012

The I-PASS Study: A Multi-Site Effort to Standardize the Handoff Process for Better Handoffs and Safer Care

Description

Communication and handoff failures are the leading root cause of sentinel events. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) program requirements mandate that training programs ensure and monitor effective, structured handoff processes. However, most programs lack the curricula and assessment tools needed to meet this requirement. The I-PASS Handoff Curriculum is an evidence-based, consensus-driven, standardized approach to teaching and evaluating resident handoffs developed by the I-PASS Study Group, which includes over 50 educators, hospitalists, and health services researchers. This resource contains a suite of curricular materials, including faculty development resources, interactive workshops, simulation based trainings, strategies to encourage cultural change and to ensure sustainability, and observation and feedback tools. All components facilitate and support the adoption and implementation of an innovative, standardized handoff process, the I-PASS Handoff Bundle, which includes team training, a verbal mnemonic, and written/computerized handoff tools.

Keywords

Communication, Quality Improvement, Pediatrics, Leadership, Patient Safety, Simulation, Medical Education, Teamwork, 2012 Readiness for Reform (R4R) Innovation Challenge, Handoffs, Change Management, Team Training, Sign-Out, Improvement Methods, Practice Improvement, Mnemonic, Medical Errors, Hospitalists

Authors

Amy J. Starmer, MD, MPH, Doernbecher Children’s Hospital; Oregon Health and Science University; Boston Children’s Hospital

Christopher P. Landrigan, MD, MPH, Boston Children’s Hospital Harvard Medical School Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Theodore C. Sectish, MD, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Madelyn Kahana, MD, Montefiore Children’s Hospital

Lauren Destino, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine

Jennifer Everhart, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine

Shilpa J. Patel, MD, Kapi’olani Medical Center for Women and Children University of Hawaii School of Medicine

Glenn Rosenbluth, MD, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital; University of California, San Francisco Medical Center

Daniel C. West, MD, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital; University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine

James F. Bale, Jr., MD, University of Utah School of Medicine

Rajendu Srivastava, MD, MPH, Primary Children’s Medical Center University of Utah School of Medicine

Adam Stevenson, MD, Primary Children’s Medical Center University of Utah School of Medicine

F. Sessions Cole, MD, University of Washington School of Medicine

Andrew J. White, MD, MSc, St. Louis Children’s Hospital Washington University School of Medicine

Michael P. Turmelle, MD, St. Louis Children’s Hospital Washington University School of Medicine

Kevin Barton, MD, University of Washington School of Medicine

Jennifer K. O'Toole, MD, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Lauren G. Solan, MD, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Maitreya Coffey, MD, FAAP, FRCPC, Hospital for Sick Children

Zia Bismilla, MD, MEd, FAAP, FRCPC, Hospital for Sick Children University of Toronto

Sahjay Mahant, MD, MSc, FRCPC, Hospital for Sick Children University of Toronto

Jennifer Hepps, MD, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center

Joseph O. Lopreiato, MD, MPH, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center National Capital Consortium

Clifton E. Yu, MD, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center National Capital Consortium

Sharon Calaman, MD, Drexel University College of Medicine

Nancy D. Spector, MD, St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children Drexel University College of Medicine

Megan E. Aylor, MD, Oregon Health and Science University

Windy Stevenson, MD, Doernbecher Children’s Hospital Oregon Health and Science University

Tamara Wagner, MD, FAAP, Doernbecher Children’s Hospital Oregon Health and Science University


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